Interviewing 101

Interviewing 101

To get you prepared, here are my 12 tips for making an interview work for you: Remember, the goal of an interview should be to get an offer. You can always turn an offer down for any reason – but you can’t turn down an offer you don’t get!!

1. Research the facility and be prepared with a “basic” level of knowledge. You don’t need to know gross margins in the various departments, but you should know enough to show the interviewer that you respect the opportunity and you respect her or his time. (Number of visits, coverage, beds, shifts)
2. Be on time, unflustered, with a clean, well-presented copy of your resume – I know this sounds simple (this is “101”, after all) but you would be surprised at how many people don’t leave 10 minutes early in order to get there 10 minutes early and forget their CV!
3. Dress the part – look “business-like” and professional, you are a professional. Look like you would if Time Magazine was putting you on the cover.
4. Be kind to every employee you meet – the receptionist, the parking lot attendant, and the janitor. You know, Southwest Airlines used to have the flight attendants on flights anonymously assess the candidates they were flying in for interviews – you never know who is going to be asked their opinion about you.
5. Think of JFK – ask not what they can do for you, answer instead “what can I do for this hospital?”
6. This is a sales presentation in which you are selling your capabilities. Don’t go into a half-hour long disquisition on the relative merits of Mozart and Beethoven, the reason you love/hate the Yankees, or the intricacies of your college rivalries.
7. Show them that you want the position. That means, show interest and be enthusiastic. You want them to feel that if they were to make an offer, they would have a real shot at getting you and you will be more likely viewed as a serious candidate for the position. If you appear to be window-shopping, then they will treat you the same. You can always reject an offer.
8. Indicate that you can do this job. Show the client that what you know, you know very well and that whatever you do not know, you can learn and learn quickly. In other words, be confident without being boastful. Your abilities and experience may determine the salary you get offered.
9.Make them feel that their situation fits a real requirement for your desire to change. You do not want them to feel that you will leave the new facility quickly because something better comes along. Saying, “I want a better opportunity” is not sufficient
10. Avoid discussion of salary. This is best left for a later date; after you and the prospective employer have had the chance to digest what has taken place on the interview. You do not want to “lock-into” anything monetarily before all the cards are on the table. If the question of money comes up because they bring it up, (and that is the only way it should come up) you should say “The money is open, I am sure that whatever you offer will be fair and equitable.” Feel free to add “I am very interested in this position and I would love to work here. I feel that I can fit in well and can be here for the long run.” Believe me, this approach works.
11. Thank the interviewer for their time and ask questions – again, this shows good manners and good sense.
12. Send a follow-up e-mail – thank the interviewer again and reiterate (very briefly) what you discussed and how you can contribute. This serves as a good memory jog to the interviewer of your conversation and reminds them of the points you want them to make for you in the hiring meeting.

River Medical Recruiting – Your Bridge to the Future